International Writers’ Day: Atlantic inspiration

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In the International Writer’s Day, from CAAC and with some help of Wikipedia, we would like to recall some of the most illustrious authors of the Atlantic Arc:

Luis de Camoës😦 c. 1524 – 10 June 1580) is considered Portugal’s and the Portuguese language’s greatest poet. His mastery of verse has been compared to that of Shakespeare, Vondel, Homer, Virgil and Dante. He wrote a considerable amount of lyrical poetry and drama but is best remembered for his epic work Os Lusíadas (The Lusiads). His recollection of poetry The Parnasum of Luís de Camões was lost in his lifetime. The influence of his masterpiece Os Lusíadas is so profound that Portuguese is called the “language of Camões”.

François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand : (4 September 1768 – 4 July 1848) was a French writer, politician, diplomat and historian. He is considered the founder of Romanticism in French literature. Descended from an old Breton aristocratic family, it is his autobiography Mémoires d’outre-tombe (“Memoirs from Beyond the Grave'”, published posthumously 1848–1850), however, which is nowadays generally considered his most accomplished work.

Jonathan Swift: (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin. He is remembered for works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier’s Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, and A Tale of a Tub. Swift is probably the foremost prose satirist in the English language,[dubious – discuss] and is less well known for his poetry. Swift originally published all of his works under pseudonyms – such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff, MB Drapier – or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire: the Horatian and Juvenalian styles.

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Rosalia de Castro: (24 February 1837 – 15 July 1885), was a Galician romanticist writer and poet. Writing in the Galician language, after the Séculos Escuros (lit. Dark Centuries), she became an important figure of the Galician romantic movement, known today as the Rexurdimento (“renaissance”), along with Manuel Curros Enríquez and Eduardo Pondal. Her poetry is marked by saudade, an almost ineffable combination of nostalgia, longing and melancholy. The date she published her first collection of poetry in Galician, Cantares gallegos (gl) (“Galician Songs”), May 17, 1863, is commemorated every year as the Día das Letras Galegas (“Galician Literature Day”), an official holiday of the Autonomous Community of Galicia, and has been dedicated to an important writer in the Galician language since 1963. Relative poverty and sadness marked her life, although she had a strong sense of commitment to the poor and to the defenseless. She was a strong opponent of abuse of authority and defender of women’s rights.

J. K. Rowling: (born 31 July 1965) is a British novelist, best known as the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. The Potter books have gained worldwide attention, won multiple awards, and sold more than 400 million copies. Born in Yate, Gloucestershire, Rowling was working as a researcher and bilingual secretary for Amnesty International when she conceived the idea for the Harry Potter series on a delayed train from Manchester to London in 1990. Rowling subsequently published 6 sequels — the last, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007) — as well as 3 supplements to the series. Since, Rowling has parted with her agency and resumed writing for adult readership, releasing the tragicomedy The Casual Vacancy (2012) and — using the pseudonym “Robert Galbraith” — the crime fiction novel The Cuckoo’s Calling (2013).

2 thoughts on “International Writers’ Day: Atlantic inspiration

  1. Pingback: 170 years inspiring the Atlantic Arc: Andrew Lang | Atlantic Arc Cities

  2. Pingback: Portugal day: Three Atlantic milestones | Atlantic Arc Cities

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